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Art Instruction

26 Sep 2017 23:16
Hello, I don't speak Dutch, but I want to ask if there's anyone who would be willing to give me beginner's art lessons? Is there an option for a private drawing session?

I'm not good at using the laptop mousepad to draw, I should probably buy a stylus. However, I know of a downloadable program which supports Bezier curves. If you're interested, I'll tell you what it is.

See you later.

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29 Sep 2017 07:45
Hi RussianBlueKot,

Drawing with a mousepad, or even a mouse, would be a massive handicap to anyone. Most people who enjoy digital drawing/painting use a drawing tablet with pressure sensitive stylus, most often a Wacom.

Dozens of programs have bezier curves, it's nothing special.

As for beginner's lessons, you could start by showing some of your work (digital or non-digital) right here in this forum.

30 Sep 2017 20:30 / last edited 30 Sep 2017 20:33
This is a Kirby I quickly threw together in Drawpile, posted on Imgur: https://imgur.com/a/9Ykzb

I drew Kirby because of the simplicity of the character design, but I don't think it's perfect. What flaws can you see?

I think I'm mainly interested in how to make the proportions good, so how good are the proportions?

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30 Sep 2017 21:49
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30 Sep 2017 23:03
I don't get it, I'm being serious.

30 Sep 2017 23:20
I'd like to explain that I drew Kirby because the design is mainly simple geometric shapes, but I feel like if I drew something more complex, I'd mess it up.

I know that for beginners, to draw a head, you start by first drawing a circle, and then lines to place the body parts, but I'm not sure how big or wide the circle for a particular character's head is supposed to be. That's why I say I'm interested in proportions.

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02 Oct 2017 17:42
The simplicity of your drawing also makes it almost impossible to comment on. Proportions are hardly relevant here. If you'd drawn his eyes higher, Kirby would look like he's looking up. If you'd drawn them smaller, he might have looked like he was squinting - but he'd still look like Kirby. Similarly for his mouth. In fact I think it's almost harder to get Kirby wrong than to get him right.

I don't recommend using a circle as the base for a head. Apart from characters like Kirby, heads are rarely circles. Also, the method with the lines is helpful to some people, but not to others. Use them if they work for you, but don't asumme that's the way it must be done.

You will have to draw more complex things if you're in any way serious about progressing. The more complex, the better. Allow yourself to fail, because that's how you learn. Not just how to correct those mistakes, but also how to avoid them, and thus to focus more on what you're good at and what you enjoy.

Step away from the geometric shape tools and draw freehand instead. If you don't have a drawing tablet, use good old pencil and paper. In fact, pencil and paper are probably the fastest way to progress for beginning artists anyway.

Show me a genuine drawing of your own hand, and then we'll talk about how you could improve - whether that's by learning more about proportions or something else.

02 Oct 2017 22:57 / last edited 02 Oct 2017 22:58
OK, thank you. But it's just that I want a live teacher to help me. I'm not so comfortable going on my own.

03 Oct 2017 00:01
I read your advice, but I think many teachers have their own opinions on what is good advice. If I were to draw, instead of pen and paper, I'd probably use a erasable whiteboard, because I'm sensitive about wasting paper. Do you agree with that? I am considering getting a drawing tablet, though.

I looked up how to draw a head, and this tutorial involves drawing a sphere and block first.
http://www.stanprokopenko.com/blog/2009/05/draw-head-any-angle/

In you spare time, do you think you could find someone willing to be a live teacher, because no one else seems to be replying. If you zoom in close enough on Drawpile, it displays a pixel grid. Pixel art seems relatively easy with a mousepad, so would the teacher be willing to do pixel art? I don't know, I'm not that knowledgeable of how art is taught.

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06 Oct 2017 16:32 / last edited 06 Oct 2017 16:33
I read your advice, but I think many teachers have their own opinions on what is good advice. If I were to draw, instead of pen and paper, I'd probably use a erasable whiteboard, because I'm sensitive about wasting paper. Do you agree with that? I am considering getting a drawing tablet, though.

Well, of course the ideas about what's good advice will differ. But I doubt anyone would contest my point that you should learn by drawing freehand. You can do that with a whiteboard, sure. If that's what you prefer, then that's what you should use. But don't choose it for the sake of saving paper. That's a terrible reason.


I looked up how to draw a head, and this tutorial involves drawing a sphere and block first.
http://www.stanprokopenko.com/blog/2009/05/draw-head-any-angle/

Breaking down complex shapes into simpler ones is a good exercise. It helps with grasping dimensions, perspective and composition. A block with ears and eyes is far from a good face, though. You'll also have to draw by example - and do so a lot - to get anywhere near the quality of the images shown on that website you linked to.


In you spare time, do you think you could find someone willing to be a live teacher, because no one else seems to be replying.

I actually used to teach art for a while myself. I'm not going to find you a teacher, though. That's up to you.


If you zoom in close enough on Drawpile, it displays a pixel grid. Pixel art seems relatively easy with a mousepad, so would the teacher be willing to do pixel art? I don't know, I'm not that knowledgeable of how art is taught.

It is true that a mouse or mousepad is more suitable for pixel art than for other art styles. However, it would be a mistake to think that getting actually good at pixel art is any easier than getting good at any other form of art. It's also a very common misconception, though, which explains why there's so much terrible pixel art around.